Here are some reviews of Argentinian films.

Argentinian Movies

The Long Night of Francisco Sanctis movie poster

The Long Night of Francisco Sanctis

in Argentinian Movies

Set in 1977 Buenos Aires, at a time when Argentina was under military dictatorship, The Long Night of Francisco Santis portrays one man’s haunting night as he struggles with a moral decision. A somewhat naïve husband and father, Francisco (Diego Velázquez – Wild Tales) was living a pretty unassuming life until an old-flame showed up to supposedly ask him permission […]

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Kékszakállú movie poster

Kékszakállú

in Argentinian Movies

A portrait of bored and wealthy teenage Buenos Aires girls, Argentine filmmaker Gaston Solnicki’s first feature is mostly a documentary in disguise. Somewhat based on Bela Bartok’s opera Kékszakállú (Bluebeard’s Castle) – from what I know of that story, this seems quite far-fetched though – the film follows a group of sisters and friends who don’t seem to know what […]

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El Movimiento movie poster

El Movimiento

in Argentinian Movies

Shot in black and white in an almost square format and clocking at just over an hour, El Movimiento is an experimental work offering a dark look at the unification of Argentina. Set in 19th century in the desolated pampa, Benjamín Naishtat’s movie opens with a cruel sequence where a handful of soldiers blow up some old man’s head with […]

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The Princess of France poster

The Princess of France

in Argentinian Movies

Watching Matias Pineiro’s The Princess of France just reminded how much I dislike modern theater. I know I’m probably going to anger quite a few of you out there, but I usually find these plays vain, pretentious and lacking scope. To clarify this, I should add that I’m not against theater as a medium, enjoying French playwrights such as Moliere […]

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Ardor poster

Ardor

in Argentinian Movies

A contemplative western set in the Amazonian jungle, Pablo Fendrik’s Ardor is a strange hybrid that might confound quite a few spectators. When the movie opens we are told that locals sometime invoke spirits from the river to come protect them. We then see a shirtless Gael Garcia Bernal (Kai) come out of the jungle, this enigmatic figure arriving just […]

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Everybody Has a Plan

Everybody Has a Plan

in Argentinian Movies

While Mexican and Brazilian cinemas have slowly been building a strong presence on the international film circuit, mostly thanks to emblematic onscreen ambassadors such as  Alfonso Cuarón, Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna – to name a few – other countries are still struggling to get their productions across the border; this, of course, doesn’t mean that their movie industry […]

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