All our movie reviews (all categories), starting with the latest, from 2012 to present. For earlier film reviews (1998 – 2011), please visit our review archive.

Post Tagged with: "Movie Reviews"

Like Someone in Love

Like Someone in Love

in Japanese Movies

Following Certified Copy, which was taking place in Italy, the Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami is now using Japan as a setting. Telling the story of a young escort girl, harassed by her jealous boyfriend, Like Someone in Love – the title is a reference to a jazz song – is fully in line with Mr. Kiarostami’s body of work. For the most […]

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Amour

Amour

in French Movies

Since the White Ribbon, which won a well-deserved Golden Palm award in Cannes, Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke seems to have found peace, having abandoned his taste for gratuitous provocation. Filled with sadness, Love shows the director’s – sometime exasperating – aspirations to take spectators hostage of his film mechanisms. This time, Mr. Haneke expresses some affection for his characters, his camera following them […]

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On The Road

On The Road

in American Movies

Published in 1957, Jack Kerouac’s autobiographical novel remains one of the most influential works coming from the Beat Generation. Following a group of friends as they travel back and forth throughout the U.S., it’s not hard to believe how this book proved to be so revolutionary at the time: Indulging in drugs, alcohol, sexual excesses and embracing the arts – […]

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Killing Them Softly

Killing Them Softly

in American Movies

Here is a film that follows genre rules but manages to surprise, taking the audience in an unexpected direction. Is it another formatted thriller? No and the main character isn’t the hitman who pretends to kill his victims softly. This isn’t one of these young wannabe thugs attempting a robbery either. The real central figure is instead the U.S., still […]

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After Lucia

After Lucia

in Mexican Movies

After Lucia is the second feature from Mexican director Michel Franco (Daniel and Ana). The film, which follows a girl’s excruciating journey as she gets relentlessly bullied at a new school, has become a symbol of the anti-bullying movement in Mexico; in the process it also became the country’s entry for the 2013 Academy Awards. Attending Q&A’s with filmmakers can […]

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Rust and Bone

Rust and Bone

in French Movies

You are watching a masterpiece! With the first shot of Rust and Bone, French director Jacques Audiard establishes the tone of his new film. Trying to set the bar high, the opening credits look like a video clip or a perfume commercial. While they aim at letting spectators know they are watching a complex, rich and deep oeuvre, they instead warn […]

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Unforgivable

Unforgivable

in French Movies

The latest film from French director André Téchiné (The Girl on the Train) is a perfect example of what American spectators usually expect from current French cinema and, to that extent, they should be satisfied: Unforgivable offers a gallery of twisted and decadent characters who cheat, lie and indulge in various vices, from sex to drugs. There are emblematic femmes […]

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The Master

The Master

in American Movies

Since his first feature, Hard Eight, writer/director Paul Thomas Anderson has been building a solid filmography which culminated with the uncompromising oil epic There Will Be Blood. Mr. Anderson has, throughout the years, developed his own narrative and thematic signature, with a taste for charismatic and damaged characters often used as threads to make us explore particular universes or eras. […]

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Holy Motors

Holy Motors

in French Movies

I have a project: becoming crazy. Holy Motors leaves you groggy, as if you were awaking from sleepwalking. This magnificent work needs to be digested slowly; we not only get enveloped by this melancholic trip but also amused by the filmmaker’s carefree attitude. This film takes us from one emotion to another – confusing, irritating, annoying, sad, funny, beautiful, ugly, well-crafted and shaky -, […]

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Cosmopolis

Cosmopolis

in American Movies

Written a few years before the recession that affected the end of the previous decade, Don DeLillo’s novel was intended as a visionary work. In six days, writer/director David Cronenberg penned an adaptation of this story showing capitalism as a vampire that sucks the blood of society. With Cosmopolis, the Canadian filmmaker delivers an icy and anxious film that revisits his […]

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Lawless

Lawless

in American Movies

With his cerebral and physical western, The Proposition, director John Hillcoat had delivered an intriguing film, which was featuring holes. Filled with ellipses, his movie was roughly built on – sometimes clumsy and disjointed – narrative blocks. Those narrative gaps were symbolized by bullet holes through which the plot was piercing. With Lawless, Mr. Hillcoat goes the opposite direction, this time making […]

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The First Man

The First Man

in French Movies

The First Man is based on an unfinished autobiographic novel by French author Albert Camus (The Stranger). The film follows his alter-ego Jean Cornery (Jacques Gamblin –The Names of Love), a famous writer who returns to Algiers on the eve of the Algerian war. As he wanders through the streets of the city, he not only remembers his childhood but is […]

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Dead Man’s Burden

Dead Man’s Burden

in American Movies

Set in sunny New Mexico, this little indie western turns out to be a surprisingly dark and twisted piece of filmmaking. From the beginning, it is clear that Dead Man’s Burden isn’t about plot – the story of a family that is torn apart about selling its farm is pretty familiar – but rather about the psychological confrontation between 3 […]

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