All our movie reviews (all categories), starting with the latest, from 2012 to present. For earlier film reviews (1998 – 2011), please visit our review archive.

Post Tagged with: "Movie Reviews"

Chico & Rita

Chico & Rita

in American Movies

From pre-revolutionary Havana to New York and Hollywood in the fifties, Paris in the sixties and modern day Las Vegas, the retro animation of Chico & Rita is visually stunning. Vibrant hand-drawn animation tells the tormented love story of a beautiful singer and talented piano player narrated in the form of a tragic bolero with the great Bebo Valdés tickling the ivories. The […]

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Summer Games

Summer Games

in Italian Movies

For his 4th film, Swiss Italian writer director Rolando Colla follows the adventures of a group of kids discovering freedom and love while vacationing in a camping.  Summer Games centers on two kids: Nic, a 12-year old boy whose mother and abusive father are trying to work things out one last time and Marie, a teenage girl desperately looking for […]

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Thursday Till Sunday

Thursday Till Sunday

in Chilean Movies

In Thursday till Sunday, director Dominga Sotomayor takes us for a drive through Chile’s deserted landscape, as passengers of a family going on a camping trip. From the beginning, as the two parents are packing the car while the kids are sleeping, we can hear the mother ask her husband quietly if he really wants her to come. In the […]

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Prometheus

Prometheus

in American Movies

While Sir Ridley Scott has been enjoying a pretty prolific and varied career, delivering a series of mostly epic and visually stunning works for over 3 decades, he is also the author of two of the most influential sci-fi films, Alien and Blade Runner. Hitting the screens respectively in 1979 and 1982, these two pieces have been landmarks redefining the […]

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In Another Country

In Another Country

in Korean Movies

With a Rhomer-like freshness, South Korean director Hong Sangsoo delivers a series of irresistible and charming skits about the adventures of a French woman and a Korean lifeguard. These romantic variations come from the imagination of a young writer whose family is ruined and struggling. She finds refuge in her writing and her characters come to life in this tasty comedy. In […]

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Paradise: Love

Paradise: Love

in Austrian movies

The first chapter of an acerb trilogy, Paradise: Love proves to be quite an ironical title as the film focuses on doomed relationships. Following the adventures of a group of Austrian women vacationing in Kenya, this movie explores one again the business of sex, which was already the theme of director Ulrich Seidl’s previous entry Import / Export. The first […]

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The Princess of Montpensier

The Princess of Montpensier

in French Movies

During his presentation at Cannes, Bertrand Tavernier had explained at a press conference his intentions with his period piece, La Princesse de Montpensier, adapted from a short story by Madame de La Fayette: by centering the film on the feelings of the main protagonists, that of four men vying for the favors of a woman, and giving the project a […]

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Sleeping Beauty

Sleeping Beauty

in Australian Movies

The premise was somewhat intriguing: In exchange of a pretty large amount of money, young women are getting lulled to be delivered to wealthy customers; when they wake up, they don’t remember anything. For her first film, writer/director Julia Leigh delivers a work that aims at teasing the spectator’s sensitivity without falling into gratuitous provocation. But it is not enough […]

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We Need to Talk About Kevin

We Need to Talk About Kevin

in American Movies

  What are the reasons that push a teen to commit an irreparable act? To this question, which consumes both the victims’ parents and the murderer’s distraught relatives, Lynne Ramsay provides no real answer. Probably because Kevin, as he himself admits to his mother, does not even know himself. And this is where lies the power of  We Need to […]

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A Prophet

A Prophet

in French Movies

While one might have expected another prison movie, A Prophet goes far beyond the limits of this sub-genre. Supported by a scenario of infinite richness, Jacques Audiard’s film takes the time to breath, halfway, taking the audience on surprising roads with unpredictable ends… Beginning with a 50 franc bill and ending with thousands of euros, A Prophet is about the […]

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The White Ribbon

The White Ribbon

in Austrian movies

One recognizes great directors by their capacity to renew themselves without abandoning their signature style or their faith in their art. Michael Haneke is among these authors and each one of his films is accompanied by feverish anticipation and suspicious curiosity. Knowing the Austrian filmmaker’s taste for shocking spectators, we can’t help but be on guard, as the provocative director […]

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Cache

Cache

in French Movies

One of the amusing things about watching an enigmatic film with an American audience fatly fed on Hollywood-style suspense is that they assume that every mystery must have a logical explanation, a twist that should be revealed in its last sequence, taking you off-guard and flattering your intelligence. At the end of the premiere at AFI Fest, there was much […]

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Time Of The Wolf

Time Of The Wolf

in French Movies

Following his provocative Piano Teacher, Michael Haneke has chosen to study the evolution of social codes following a disaster. While the film never reveals what happened, what interests the director here is the aftermath rather than the cause, as the absence of any police or military presence seems to point at some conflict-type event. Time of the Wolf follows Isabelle […]

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